Self Portrait as Superman | A digital complement to LLYN FOULKES 
Foulkes deeply admired his father-in-law, Ward Kimball, one of the head animators at Disney Studios. In the late 1970s, Kimball gave him a copy of the Mickey Mouse Club Handbook from 1934, and Foulkes read the letter inside detailing how the club would teach its members to be good, polite citizens. Appalled by what he regarded as an effort to brainwash children, he developed skepticism and distrust that have continued to haunt him and his work. In his 2007 painting Deliverance, he has finally triumphed: a dead Mickey Mouse lies on the floor, steam rising from a gunshot wound. Foulkes looks on, holding the smoking gun. Here the self-portrait is pivotal to the picture: it wasn’t just anybody who shot Mickey Mouse; it was the vigilante artist Llyn Foulkes.
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Self Portrait as Superman | A digital complement to LLYN FOULKES

Foulkes deeply admired his father-in-law, Ward Kimball, one of the head animators at Disney Studios. In the late 1970s, Kimball gave him a copy of the Mickey Mouse Club Handbook from 1934, and Foulkes read the letter inside detailing how the club would teach its members to be good, polite citizens. Appalled by what he regarded as an effort to brainwash children, he developed skepticism and distrust that have continued to haunt him and his work. In his 2007 painting Deliverance, he has finally triumphed: a dead Mickey Mouse lies on the floor, steam rising from a gunshot wound. Foulkes looks on, holding the smoking gun. Here the self-portrait is pivotal to the picture: it wasn’t just anybody who shot Mickey Mouse; it was the vigilante artist Llyn Foulkes.